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Chemistry Library blog

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The news blog for the University of Cambridge, Department of Chemistry Library
Updated: 1 hour 42 min ago

National Chemical Database Service: help to justify its continued support

Fri, 03/10/2017 - 09:23

Do you know about or already use the National Chemical Database Service (NCDS)?

It is an EPSRC-funded service provided by the Royal Society of Chemistry to all students and other members of UK academic institutions. It brings together tools and resources for UK researchers in chemistry and related fields.

All web-based services are freely accessible from any UK academic network. These include:

  • ACD/I-Lab – an online tool which features predictions and databases of physicochemical properties and NMR spectral information.an online tool which features predictions and databases of physicochemical properties and NMR spectral information.
  • Available Chemicals Directory (ACD) – a database of commercially available chemicals that can be searched by structure.
  • Chemicalize – a public web resource which identifies chemical structures in webpages and other text using ChemAxon’s Name to Structure parsing.
  • ChemSpider – a free chemical structure database providing access to over 28 million structures, properties and associated information from more than 400 data sources.
  • Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) – a collection of over 600,000 small-molecule organic and organometallic crystal structures that can be visualised and downloaded.
  • CrystalWorks – provides access to the wide range of crystallographic structural data made available by the Chemical Database Service.
  • DETHERM -one of the world’s largest thermophysical databases and contains data for 4,200,000 data sets, 129,500 mixtures, and 38,850 pure compounds.
  • Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) – the world’s largest database for fully identified inorganic crystal structures.
  • SPRESIweb – allows users to search 5.52 million molecules and 4.26 million reactions, extracted from 675,000 references and 164,000 patents covering the years 1974 – 2011.

Find more information about these resources here.

Help to demonstrate the scientific impact of the NCDS

The NCDS needs your help:

The National Chemical Database Service is supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council on the basis that it meets a community need: access to specialist databases that enable research in chemistry and related fields. As part of EPSRC’s routine review of mid-range facility provision, we are preparing an application (called a Statement of Need) to justify continued support of the NCDS after 2017. While we will collate the application on behalf of our Advisory Board, it represents the views and needs of the UK scientific community, so your input is vital to its success. You can help us ensure that all of UK academia retains access to the NCDS resources in the following ways:

Please see the post on the Chemical Database Service Blog here.


Filed under: databases, EPSRC, eresources, RSC

New books purchased

Fri, 03/03/2017 - 16:03

These books were recommended by members of the Department of Chemistry and are now available to borrow from the Chemistry Library.

Oswald, P., & Pieranski, P. (2005). Nematic and cholesteric liquid crystals : Concepts and physical properties illustrated by experiments / Patrick Oswald, Pawel Pieranski ; translated by Doru Constantin. (Liquid crystals book series). Chemistry Library shelfmark: QD293 .O89 2005

Lander, J. (2014). R for Everyone : Advanced Analytics and Graphics / Jared P. Lander. (Addison Wesley Data & Analytics Series). Chemistry Library shelfmark: QA76.73.R3 .L36 2014

Berg, J., Tymoczko, J., Stryer, L., & Gatto, G. (2015). Biochemistry / Jeremy M. Berg, John L. Tymoczko, Gregory J. Gatto, Jr., Lubert Stryer. (Eighth ed.). Chemistry Library shelfmark: QP514.2 .B47 2015

Gierasch, L., Horwich, A., Slingsby, C., Wickner, S., & Agard, D. (2016). Structure and action of molecular chaperones : Machines that assist protein folding in the cell / Lila M. Gierasch, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Arthur L. Horwich, Yale School of Medicine, Christine Slingsby, University of London, Sue Wickner, National Cancer Institute, David Agard, UC San Francisco. (Series in structural biology ; vol. 6). Chemistry Library shelfmark: QP551 .G54 2016

See here for guidance on how to recommend a book or ebook, journal or ejournal, or a database.

 


Filed under: books, Uncategorized

New ebooks – February 2017

Fri, 03/03/2017 - 15:18

ebooks@cambridge

Here is a selection of the titles added to the ebooks@cambridge collection during February. These titles were purchased by, or on behalf of, department and faculty libraries within the University of Cambridge and by the University Library.

Click on the cover image to access the title via our authenticated links.

                                                                                

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Filed under: ebooks

Journal of Imaging Science and Technology

Fri, 03/03/2017 - 15:16

ejournals@cambridge

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Journal of Imaging Science and Technology.

From IngentaConnect and the journal website:

“The Journal of Imaging Science and Technology (JIST) is dedicated to the advancement of imaging science knowledge, the practical applications of such knowledge, and how imaging science relates to other fields of study. ”

“Typical issues include research papers and/or comprehensive reviews from a variety of topical areas. In the spirit of fostering constructive scientific dialog, the Journal accepts Letters to the Editor commenting on previously published articles. Periodically the Journal features a Special Section containing a group of related— usually invited—papers introduced by a Guest Editor. Imaging research topics that have coverage in JIST include:

  • Digital printing technologies, including ink jet and thermal printing
  • Digital fabrication
  • Materials and processes of electrophotography
  • Prepress and printing technologies
  • Image capture media and technologies including digital cameras
  • Image analysis, interpretation, and quality
  • Color image science

View original post 60 more words


Filed under: ejournals

Make your data and papers open via Symplectic

Tue, 02/21/2017 - 14:17

Open Access and Open Data are changing: Share everything via Symplectic

Demo of new system in the Pfizer Lecture Theatre for members of the Department of Chemistry on 28th February at 13:15

The current Open Access and Open Data services are being integrated with Symplectic Elements, which will bring many benefits to researchers, administrators and the Open Access and Open Data staff. The new system is live and we are asking researchers at the Department of Chemistry to start using it now. The benefits of the new system include:

  • you can deposit your data and articles in one place
  • you will instantly receive a placeholder DOI for data
  • your outputs get into the repository quicker, which increases their visibility
  • you enter the information about your publication once but it is used in many systems saving you time in the future
  • better reporting capabilities for the Open Access/Data, which means more accurate reports for Departments, Faculties and Schools
  • all research outputs can be uploaded to the repository via the new system

Come and see the new system being demonstrated and find out more about using it for all your research outputs. The demo will take approximately 30 minutes and there will be time for questions and answers.

Find out more here: http://osc.cam.ac.uk/open-research/symplectic-elements-deposit-pilot

We look forward to seeing you there!


Filed under: Open Access, open data, publishing, repositories, Research Data Management (RDM), Symplectic, Tools to help you do your research, Uncategorized

ebrary content has moved to Ebook Central

Mon, 01/16/2017 - 10:24

ebooks@cambridge

As of January 12th 2017, all ebook content previously hosted on ebrary has moved to Ebook Central. This includes ebooks purchased by ebooks@cambridge and faculty/departmental libraries and ebooks made available through the ebrary DDA scheme funded by the UL.

What will happen to links to ebrary?

Existing links to individual ebooks on ebrary and to the platform itself now redirect seamlessly to Ebook Central. So links within iDiscover, Moodle or other platforms will take you to Ebook Central. We have tested a number of links to confirm this, but please let us know if you find any that are not redirecting correctly.

What if I have saved content within ebrary?

If you had saved anything to your ebrary bookmarks prior to the switch (including favourite ebooks or annotations), you will need to log in to Ebook Central and follow a few simple steps to transfer your bookmarks:

View original post 154 more words


Filed under: ebooks

e-EROS Encyclopedia of Reagents for Organic Synthesis

Wed, 01/11/2017 - 15:23

We hope this database will be of use to chemists.

ejournals@cambridge

The University of Cambridge now has access to the important reference work for reagents and catalysts for the study or organic synthesis, e-EROS Encyclopedia of Reagents for Organic Synthesis.

The Encyclopedia can be accessed via this link or via the Cambridge LibGuides Databases A-Z.

e-EROS gives detailed information on more than 4,500 reagents and catalysts, and every year more than 200 new or updated articles are added in order to keep the Database up-to-date.

A representation of quite a small molecule: an isomer of the alkane C16H34. Possibly the simplest molecule that can never be made.

Access has been enabled by collaboration between the University Library, the Betty and Gordon Moore Library and the Department of Chemistry Library.

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Filed under: databases

Review of 2016 programme

Tue, 01/10/2017 - 17:16

Fascinating reading!

23 Research Things Cambridge

Welcome to the 23 Research Things Cambridge blog! For those of you who haven’t been here before, 23 Research Things ran for the first time in Cambridge between October and December 2016 and we had lots of lovely people taking part with their blogs, video views, comments and much more.

So, we’ve taken a look at all the stats that everyone generated and combined them with all the lovely feedback and other data that we got from participants and put it all into a snazzy report. If you want to read the whole report, which includes details on how the programme was developed, check it out here.

For everyone else, here are some of the more interesting facts!

View original post 838 more words


Filed under: 23 Research Things

New ebooks – December 2016

Wed, 01/04/2017 - 13:51

Chemists may be interested in these titles: Hazardous air pollutants, Physical Properties of Textile Fibres (Fourth Edition), Soft Matter Physics.

ebooks@cambridge

Here is a selection of the titles added to the ebooks@cambridge collection during December. These titles were purchased by, or on behalf of, department and faculty libraries within the University of Cambridge and by the University Library.

Click on the cover image to access the title via our authenticated links.

                                                                                

View original post


Filed under: ebooks

Find out what books we have recently purchased

Tue, 12/13/2016 - 16:20

Please visit our ‘Recommend a book or other resource‘ web page for a link to a list of what we have recently purchased.

The books were either recommended by our readers, or by lecturers as part of their undergraduate reading lists (Blue Books), or were new editions of textbooks.

You will see that we have been purchasing more computational chemistry and drug discovery titles, in order to support the increasing amount of research that is taking place in these areas within the department.

We welcome recommendations for the purchase of books (and ebooks) for the Chemistry Library collections from our readers, as well as for journals and databases. Please see the above website for further information on how to do this.


Filed under: books, Chemistry library services

Bonus Thing 24 – Behind the Scenes

Mon, 12/05/2016 - 12:11

It’s like the ‘how we did this bit’ section at the end of each Planet Earth II episode!

23 Research Things Cambridge

By the time you read this, the first live run of the 23 Research Things programme will have just concluded with (hopefully) lots of success and accolades.

But what actually goes into making a programme like 23 Research Things? Why did we use YouTube videos and what did Moore Methods have to do with it all? Well in our typical style, we made a video about it so check it out.

Bonus Thing 24 activities

Watch some videos from any of the following channels: The Brain Scoop [can contain dissections so watch with caution], PBS Ideas Channel, SciShow.

What did you like about the suggested videos that you watched? What didn’t you like? Is there anything that they did or featured that you could incorporate into your research or work?

What did you think about our Moore Methods videos?

To help us do better at this sort of thing, don’t…

View original post 78 more words


Filed under: 23 Research Things, researchers, videos