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Chemistry Library blog

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The news blog for the University of Cambridge, Department of Chemistry Library
Updated: 12 min 3 sec ago

New books recently purchased

Fri, 06/16/2017 - 10:03

Convert your files containing experimental data into an open data format

Tue, 06/13/2017 - 15:29

As part of the Data Champions initiative, we invite members of the Department of Chemistry to contribute to this list of instructions for converting the data you generate through experiments using techniques such as NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, x-ray crystallography, etc. into open data formats that can be shared easily.

The aim is to save researchers time and effort in trying to find this out themselves, and to make it as easy as possible for them to share their data in an open format that is accessible to everyone.

Please send your instructions to library@ch.cam.ac.uk and the Librarian will add them to this list.

Please visit the Chemistry Library’s Open Data website to find out more about the Data Champions in the Department of Chemistry, and other resources that will help chemists do open research.


Filed under: data champions, experiments, general, Open Access, open data, open science, Research Data Management (RDM), researchers, Tools to help you do your research

Digital thesis pilot at the Department of Chemistry

Tue, 06/13/2017 - 15:10

For the academic year 2016/17 the University is piloting electronic thesis submission with several departments, including Chemistry.

If you are submitting a thesis in the academic year 2016/17, you are requested to submit an electronic thesis to Apollo alongside the print copy you need to submit to the Student Registry.

The University repository, Apollo has recently been upgraded and is now able to accept all thesis types. There is an online form for theses to make the deposit process simple and fast.

Find out more at: http://osc.cam.ac.uk/theses/digital-thesis-pilot.


Filed under: Apollo, theses

Re-imagining library spaces at the University of Cambridge

Wed, 05/10/2017 - 15:46

Take a look at ‘The Tracker Project’ report by Furturelib! Students using the Chemistry Library wore eyetracking devices while finding books and other items – with fascinating results. We will digest the project findings and hopefully act upon them in future.

Let us know what you think!

Source: Re-imagining library spaces at the University of Cambridge


Filed under: Futurelib, iDiscover, Library catalogue, library space, students, undergraduates, UX (user experience)

Do you know where these two missing books are?

Thu, 05/04/2017 - 17:21

These are the only two books that we found to be missing during our annual stock check:

Organic synthesis : the disconnection approach / Stuart Warren and Paul Wyatt. QD262.W37 2008. 2nd ed. (Short loan copy).

Workbook for organic synthesis : the disconnection approach / Stuart Warren and Paul Wyatt. QD262.W37 2009 (Short loan copy).

Have you seen them anywhere? Please could you check your offices, labs, rooms in case they have found their way there.


Filed under: missing books

Moore Library’s Scan & Deliver now free

Thu, 05/04/2017 - 17:01


This free service is provided by the Betty & Gordon Moore Library to allow Cambridge University staff and students to get remote access to any of its material that is not currently available electronically.

Complete the online form to request a scan from a journal article or book that is held in its collections. The service aims to deliver documents to you by email within a 24-hour time-frame. This saves you time and effort in visiting the Moore Library personally to scan / copy items (although it is a really nice place to work in, see here!).

Please be aware that the service only covers the holdings of the Betty & Gordon Moore Library. It is not able to provide scans from material held at any other library within the University, including the main University Library.

 


Filed under: scanning

iDiscover help: What do records mentioning “Online access restricted to designated PCs”, or “UL: Temporary Store 2” mean?

Thu, 05/04/2017 - 16:43

What does “Online access restricted to designated PCs in the main UL + affiliate libraries” mean?

Where it says on a record for a journal or a book that “Online access restricted to designated PCs in the main UL + affiliate libraries”, this means that it is an e-legal deposit copy.

Cambridge University Library is one of six ‘legal deposit’ libraries in the UK & Ireland. This means it must receive a copy of every book and journal published in the UK from the publisher, for free. Recently the law was changed to include electronic books and journals and so many publishers now choose to deposit the online versions instead. These items are available on designated PCs in the main University Library and some Affiliated Libraries only (which does not include the Chemistry Library). You cannot save the PDF, and may not be able to print it off either.

Find out more on how to access e-legal deposit items here.

What does “UL: Temporary Store 2. Request via Inter-Library Loan” mean?

Many items are currently being held in an off-site store which is not accessible, i.e. a ‘dark’ store. This will include physical material formerly held by either the Betty & Gordon Moore Library, the Central Science Library, the University Library or the Medical Library.

If a record on iDiscover says that an item’s location is “UL: Temporary Store 2. Request via Inter-Library Loan” this means that you need to make a free request for it as an Inter-Library Loan item. We recommend that you use the Betty & Gordon Moore Library’s Inter-Library Loan service to do this. You can complete their online form to request an item to be scanned for and sent to you.

 


Filed under: iDiscover, inter-library loans, Library catalogue, Library tools, Uncategorized

Did you know that you can scan items in the library and send them to your @cam email address as a PDF, for free? Find out what else you can do using our ‘multifunctional device’ …

Thu, 05/04/2017 - 16:31

You may not be aware of this but you can use our library MFD (MultiFunctional Device) to do all of these things:

  • Scan items and send them to your @cam email address as a PDF, for free!
  • Scan or photocopy multiple-page documents using the feeder on top of the machine – even if they’re two-sided! (Multiple-page documents can be scanned into one whole document).
  • Staple your copied/printed documents!
  • Send print jobs from your own laptop or workstation! (Instructions here).

The library MFD is located in the Print Room next to the Library Office. We have just written new instructions on how to use the MFD for scanning and copying and displayed them in the Print Room. They are also available on our IT Facilities website here.

There are two other MFDs located in Rooms G30 and 154. You can collect (‘release’) the print jobs that you send from a computer in the library (or from your laptop or workstation) from any of these.

Undergraduates can find out how to send and pay for photocopying and printing here.

Postgraduate students and researchers can ask library staff to credit their account from a grant/ledger code to pay for printing and photocopying.

The scans are in colour, and we think they are of great quality, as well as being quick and easy to do as compared with using a traditional flatbed scanner! Give it a go! But maybe don’t what this Minion is doing!


Filed under: Chemistry library services, mcs, photocopying, printing, scanning

Want to work in your room but need an app which is only on University computers?

Thu, 05/04/2017 - 16:26

Use DS-Remote!

DS-Remote is a service exclusively for the use of University of Cambridge students to aid in access to Windows applications outside of the MCS for use on a device, having installed a remote desktop client.

 


Filed under: mcs, software, students, Tools to help you do your research, undergraduates

Access your favourite cloud storage on MCS Windows

Thu, 05/04/2017 - 16:25

Did you know that on MCS Windows its possible to access your favourite cloud storage?

Click on the Start button on the MCS (ex-PWF) machines in the Chemistry Library, or in Rooms G30 and 154:

Start -> Microsoft -> OneDrive
Start -> Dropbox -> Dropbox
Start -> Google -> Google Drive


Filed under: Chemistry library services, cloud storage, mcs, Research Data Management (RDM), Tools to help you do your research

Shiny new things now available in the Chemistry Library to make your life easier

Thu, 05/04/2017 - 16:23

As a result of feedback from undergraduate students on the Committee for the Library and Scholarly Communication, we have purchased the following:

Some new mice

The mice currently in use are quite cheap and insubstantial. We have spent (only a little) bit more money on a selection of three mice from Logitech, follow these links to find out more:

These will be kept in the Library Office to borrow, just ask when you need one.

Polypockets

Apparently these are useful for students when they are photocopying. These are located in the Print Room (the small room next to the Library Office).

An anti-glare screen hood

Sometimes there is glare on the computer screens in the library. This adjustable hood will be kept in the Library Office to borrow, just ask when you need it.

We hope these help. Please do not remove them from the Library!


Filed under: Chemistry library services, students, undergraduates

SpringerMaterials trial extended to 30 May 2017

Thu, 04/27/2017 - 09:55

Please do try out the database with your real life examples and let Clair have your feedback. She cannot put forward a recommendation to purchase this database without it.

Make the most of access while you have it!

ejournals@cambridge

Further to the notice promoting the trial access to the SpringerMaterials database we are pleased to inform that the trial has been extended to 30 May 2017 to allow for a full review of this resource for the materials science, chemistry and engineering user communities.

To access the trial please go to:

http://materials.springer.com/

or off campus login via Shibboleth or via ezproxy here:

http://ezproxy.lib.cam.ac.uk:2048/login?url=http://materials.springer.com/
Please send your valuable feedback on this resource to Clair Castle, Librarian at the Department of Chemistry, at cmc32@cam.ac.uk.

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Filed under: databases, Springer

SpringerMaterials trial access begins today

Fri, 04/07/2017 - 09:44

Trial access to SpringerMaterials starts today and ends on 2nd May.

Please go to http://materials.springer.com/ (access within the University of Cambridge only) to get access to the complete database, which has been specifically designed to save you a LOT of time when searching for materials properties.

Please send your valuable feedback on this resource to Clair Castle, Librarian at the Department of Chemistry, at cmc32@cam.ac.uk.

About the database:

SpringerMaterials is a comprehensive database for identifying materials properties and covers data from materials science, physics, physical and inorganic chemistry, engineering and other related fields.

Vast collection of quality content:

  • Covering multiple material types, property classes and applications.

Interactive functionality saving time:

  • Interactive crystal structures, data tables, phase diagrams, and fast data export are tools help save critical time and provide deep insights into material structures and properties.

Materials science related search options:

  • Multiple search tools to quickly find material property data.

Trusted and curated resource:

  • Thousands of materials science experts around the globe work to ensure the high quality of the platform.

How SpringerMaterials helps researchers:

  • Access the most comprehensive and multidisciplinary collection of materials and chemical properties with extensive coverage of all major topics in materials science and related disciplines.
  • Take advantage of the best and most trusted materials science sources such as Landolt Börnstein data on a single platform. Comprising journals, books and standalone data sets.
  • Save time with accurate and efficient search results using multiple specialized search and result refinement functions.
  • Take advantage of interactive functionalities to analyze, manipulate and visual different data types quickly.
  • Integrate materials data types easily in your research workflow with data export in standard formats.

SpringerMaterials infographic


Filed under: databases, Springer

New ebooks – March 2017

Wed, 04/05/2017 - 09:51

The “Machine learning” title may be of interest to chemists.

ebooks@cambridge

Here is a selection of the titles added to the ebooks@cambridge collection during March. These titles were purchased by, or on behalf of, department and faculty libraries within the University of Cambridge and by the University Library.

Click on the cover image to access the title via our authenticated links.

                                                                         

View original post


Filed under: ebooks

SpringerMaterials webinar and trial access coming soon!

Thu, 03/30/2017 - 11:52

SpringerMaterials is a comprehensive database for identifying materials properties and covers data from materials science, physics, physical and inorganic chemistry, engineering and other related fields.

SpringerMaterials research benefits:

  • A single platform covering curated data from all major topics in materials science, chemistry, physics and engineering
  • Take advantage of specialized integrated features to analyze, manipulate, and visualize different data types
  • Save time with multiple search methods and advanced result refining options
  • Export data in multiple formats for further use in other software/applications

The University has arranged trial access to SpringerMaterials from 5th April until 2nd May, during which time you will be able to access the complete database. Details of how to access the database will be circulated on 5th April.

A webinar* demonstrating the database will take place on 5th April between 14:30 and 15:15. You can attend this remotely or view it in the Todd-Hamied Room, Department of Chemistry. If you are not able to attend on the day, the webinar will be available throughout the trial period, but we would strongly recommend that you attend on the day as it will highlight the most relevant and useful features and you will have the opportunity to ask questions.

Please register your attendance at the webinar here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3688859693808838915

Please let us know that you want to attend the webinar in person here: https://doodle.com/poll/mux298zu2c4w3tc3

SpringerMaterials infographic


Filed under: databases, eresources, Springer

National Chemical Database Service: help to justify its continued support

Fri, 03/10/2017 - 09:23

Do you know about or already use the National Chemical Database Service (NCDS)?

It is an EPSRC-funded service provided by the Royal Society of Chemistry to all students and other members of UK academic institutions. It brings together tools and resources for UK researchers in chemistry and related fields.

All web-based services are freely accessible from any UK academic network. These include:

  • ACD/I-Lab – an online tool which features predictions and databases of physicochemical properties and NMR spectral information.an online tool which features predictions and databases of physicochemical properties and NMR spectral information.
  • Available Chemicals Directory (ACD) – a database of commercially available chemicals that can be searched by structure.
  • Chemicalize – a public web resource which identifies chemical structures in webpages and other text using ChemAxon’s Name to Structure parsing.
  • ChemSpider – a free chemical structure database providing access to over 28 million structures, properties and associated information from more than 400 data sources.
  • Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) – a collection of over 600,000 small-molecule organic and organometallic crystal structures that can be visualised and downloaded.
  • CrystalWorks – provides access to the wide range of crystallographic structural data made available by the Chemical Database Service.
  • DETHERM -one of the world’s largest thermophysical databases and contains data for 4,200,000 data sets, 129,500 mixtures, and 38,850 pure compounds.
  • Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) – the world’s largest database for fully identified inorganic crystal structures.
  • SPRESIweb – allows users to search 5.52 million molecules and 4.26 million reactions, extracted from 675,000 references and 164,000 patents covering the years 1974 – 2011.

Find more information about these resources here.

Help to demonstrate the scientific impact of the NCDS

The NCDS needs your help:

The National Chemical Database Service is supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council on the basis that it meets a community need: access to specialist databases that enable research in chemistry and related fields. As part of EPSRC’s routine review of mid-range facility provision, we are preparing an application (called a Statement of Need) to justify continued support of the NCDS after 2017. While we will collate the application on behalf of our Advisory Board, it represents the views and needs of the UK scientific community, so your input is vital to its success. You can help us ensure that all of UK academia retains access to the NCDS resources in the following ways:

Please see the post on the Chemical Database Service Blog here.


Filed under: databases, EPSRC, eresources, RSC

New books purchased

Fri, 03/03/2017 - 16:03

These books were recommended by members of the Department of Chemistry and are now available to borrow from the Chemistry Library.

Oswald, P., & Pieranski, P. (2005). Nematic and cholesteric liquid crystals : Concepts and physical properties illustrated by experiments / Patrick Oswald, Pawel Pieranski ; translated by Doru Constantin. (Liquid crystals book series). Chemistry Library shelfmark: QD293 .O89 2005

Lander, J. (2014). R for Everyone : Advanced Analytics and Graphics / Jared P. Lander. (Addison Wesley Data & Analytics Series). Chemistry Library shelfmark: QA76.73.R3 .L36 2014

Berg, J., Tymoczko, J., Stryer, L., & Gatto, G. (2015). Biochemistry / Jeremy M. Berg, John L. Tymoczko, Gregory J. Gatto, Jr., Lubert Stryer. (Eighth ed.). Chemistry Library shelfmark: QP514.2 .B47 2015

Gierasch, L., Horwich, A., Slingsby, C., Wickner, S., & Agard, D. (2016). Structure and action of molecular chaperones : Machines that assist protein folding in the cell / Lila M. Gierasch, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Arthur L. Horwich, Yale School of Medicine, Christine Slingsby, University of London, Sue Wickner, National Cancer Institute, David Agard, UC San Francisco. (Series in structural biology ; vol. 6). Chemistry Library shelfmark: QP551 .G54 2016

See here for guidance on how to recommend a book or ebook, journal or ejournal, or a database.

 


Filed under: books, Uncategorized

New ebooks – February 2017

Fri, 03/03/2017 - 15:18

ebooks@cambridge

Here is a selection of the titles added to the ebooks@cambridge collection during February. These titles were purchased by, or on behalf of, department and faculty libraries within the University of Cambridge and by the University Library.

Click on the cover image to access the title via our authenticated links.

                                                                                

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Filed under: ebooks

Journal of Imaging Science and Technology

Fri, 03/03/2017 - 15:16

ejournals@cambridge

New on ejournals@cambridge A-Z : Journal of Imaging Science and Technology.

From IngentaConnect and the journal website:

“The Journal of Imaging Science and Technology (JIST) is dedicated to the advancement of imaging science knowledge, the practical applications of such knowledge, and how imaging science relates to other fields of study. ”

“Typical issues include research papers and/or comprehensive reviews from a variety of topical areas. In the spirit of fostering constructive scientific dialog, the Journal accepts Letters to the Editor commenting on previously published articles. Periodically the Journal features a Special Section containing a group of related— usually invited—papers introduced by a Guest Editor. Imaging research topics that have coverage in JIST include:

  • Digital printing technologies, including ink jet and thermal printing
  • Digital fabrication
  • Materials and processes of electrophotography
  • Prepress and printing technologies
  • Image capture media and technologies including digital cameras
  • Image analysis, interpretation, and quality
  • Color image science

View original post 60 more words


Filed under: ejournals